Letter: More political theater

To the Editor:

Dem vows: “We Have to get this Right” as the Jan. 6th probe begins. My opinion — just more political theater.

The one thing I think most Americans can agree on is what happened on January 6th was, at the very least, a tragedy and an embarrassment to this country. Whether you believe it was an insurrection or a bunch of irrational, stupid idiots caught up in a demonstration gone bad, somewhat depends on political views. So what is an insurrection? The following definition is based on case law and is from the webpage U.S. Legal: Insurrection means “a violent uprising by a group or movement acting for the specific purpose of overthrowing the constituted government and seizing its powers.” While no one can dispute the violence, it’s hard to believe that a few hundred demonstrator/rioters with ball bats, steel flagpoles and possibly a few handguns (some police said they thought a couple of demonstrators may have had concealed guns) would actually think they could overthrow the United States Government. Shortly after January 6th, I wrote Senator Brown regarding the lack of security and had this been a terrorist attack our government would have been in absolute chaos. Brown’s response a month and a half later reads like something from the New York Times, points fingers at everyone not a Democrat, even gets race into it, but avoids my questions of why the security was so deficient. I had not asked for some political hit piece, just an answer about the security and maybe where the buck stopped. Since then, it has come out that authorities in D.C. were warned about the large numbers of people coming to D.C., but failed to follow up and that Mrs. Pelosi is or may be responsible for security since the House Sargent at Arms, who is in charge of security, is supervised by the speaker. Either way she has some conflict of interest. If we were to have the January 6 committee, it was most important that it be bipartisan, perhaps made up of moderate members from both parties. That was the only way for possibly a chance at a true bipartisan investigation. But for the first known time of the House, the speaker rejected two of the minority leader’s nominees to a select committee. Pelosi’s own press office acknowledged that this was an unprecedented decision. Now here we are, with a partisan committee, whose members were appointed by someone that seems to have a huge conflict of interest, either directly or indirectly, that in an honest world would have been asked or required to recuse her self – But this is D.C.

With this committee and Democrats overall attitude about the last four and a half years, it’s hard for me to think that this won’t be just more political theater and a continuation of the political noise of the last four years.

— William Cox

Troy